George MeliosCV & Portfolio

Research

SORTING BY DATE
Oct 2022

Regression to the Extreme? Investigating affective polarisation in the UK


Selected with P. Dolan

Regression to the Extreme? Investigating affective polarisation in the UK

with P. Dolan
Selected
Sep 2022

Who needs security in a crisis? Evidence from a field experiment in Lebanon


Selected with Y. Sleiman, E. Pietrostefani and H. Moore

Who needs security in a crisis? Evidence from a field experiment in Lebanon

with Y. Sleiman, E. Pietrostefani and H. Moore
Selected
Jun 2022

Assessing welfare disparities in EU Regions


with P. Papadimitriou

Assessing welfare disparities in EU Regions

with P. Papadimitriou
Mar 2021

Weather to Protest: The Effect of Black Lives Matter Protests on the 2020 Presidential Election


Selected with B. Klein Teeselink

Weather to Protest: The Effect of Black Lives Matter Protests on the 2020 Presidential Election

with B. Klein Teeselink
Selected
Feb 2022

Partisanship, Government Responsibility, and Charitable Donations


Selected with B. Klein Teeselink

Partisanship, Government Responsibility, and Charitable Donations

with B. Klein Teeselink
Selected
About The Publication

A large literature in public economics seeks to answer whether government activity crowds out charitable donations, but the empirical evidence is mixed. To resolve this inconsistency, we consider that people base their donation decisions not only on government spending per se, but also on their support of the government. Using US tax return data, we find that support for the incumbent president crowds out charitable donations. The reduction in donations cannot be explained by changes in government spending, beliefs about government spending, government grants to Republican or Democrat-leaning charities, or fundraising activity. Instead, it is consistent with the notion that partisans attribute greater problem-solving responsibilities to own-party governments.

Keywords: Crowding out, Charities, Donations, Partisanship, Beliefs